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🌪️ What another Andrew could do to Miami

In honor of #throwbackthursday...

Come along for the ride

A few weeks ago, we asked if you wanted to invest in The New Tropic and our mission to make the most of this beautiful, crazy city we call home.

Since we launched two and a half years ago, we’ve explored neighborhoods, decoded constitutional amendments, poked around in delightful kitchens, and hosted talks on everything from neighborhood change to sea level rise to the transgender experience.

And we’re just getting started. 💪

We’re really excited that so many of you have already joined us via SeedInvest. With your investments, some of them as small as $500, we’ve blown our goal of $50,000 out of the water 🙌  – and now we’re charging toward our stretch goal of $250,000.

Every bit helps us do things bigger and better. We’d love it if you joined us for the ride. There’s still 14 days left. You can find out more here.

Thanks y’all. You make our world go round, and make it fun and meaningful to do what we do. 😍

– The New Tropic

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COME OUT AND PLAY

Doral Legacy Park is debuting this Saturday, August 12, with a grand opening. Help us break in 18+ acres of brand, spankin’ new sports facilities, courts, and parks, with BBQ, live music, games, and  bragging rights in the domino tournament.

Produced for Baptist Health South Florida.
Break the routine and vacation where you live. Miami’s got all the summer deals for locals looking to rediscover their backyard. Learn More ».
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What's New In The 305

💩 + 🏖️ = 🚫. Health officials say North Beach around 73rd Street is a no-go zone RN after finding fecal bacteria in the water. (Miami Herald)

Hot in herre. Sea levels rose faster in the Southeast U.S., especially Florida, than anywhere else in recent years. Scientists say it’s because we’re a “hotspot.” If you wanna do something about it, you can go to a CLEO Institute training on how to become a climate change leader for your neighborhood. (NYT, WLRN)  

Comeback king. Last year cyclist Tony Napoliello got hit by a car biking in Virginia Key, prompting bikers to ask if ANYWHERE in Miami is safe for them. His injuries were bad, but his comeback story is stronger. (Local 10)

Power moves. Black Enterprise shouted out these six local entrepreneurs who are pushing the envelope in the Magic City.

Bad math. The opioid crisis in South Florida took more than 1,000 lives last year. And now Florida is losing a $20.4 million federal grant for mental illness and substance abuse treatment. Some state legislators had no clue this was coming, and now they’re scrambling to fill the gap. (Sun Sentinel)

Red alert. 25 years ago, Hurricane Andrew slammed Miami-Dade. Since then, we’ve overhauled building codes and done some serious hurricane prep education, but insurance company Swiss Re says we’re worse off now. They analyzed what a storm of Andrew’s strength would do to Miami today, and it’s not pretty. (AP)  

If you give a tiger to a stripper, they might end up rescued and sent to Everglades Outpost. The Homestead animal refuge takes in animals with sketchy pasts and nurses them back to health. Rocky, Cheeky, and a whole zoo of other animals are up for visitors. (Miami.com)   

Just hangin’ out. Miami’s famously weird giant sloth sculpture needs a home. Omni Park was supposed to take it from the old Frost Museum of Science location, but turns out it can’t because it’s a pop-up park. The Miami New Times suggests five other places it could go.

CIC Miami wants to capture the personality of Miami locals. Got a worthy photo submission? Submit and possibly get your artwork featured. Learn More ».
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