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Good morning *|FNAME|*. The turnout for March for Our Lives rallies across South Florida this weekend has us feelin’ inspired and determined this Monday.

While tens of thousands turned out at rallies across South Florida, hundreds of local students hopped on buses and planes and headed to the main march in D.C. to make their voices heard. Among them were a couple dozen teenagers from Liberty City and nearby neighborhoods, who traveled thousands of miles to make sure the country heard that “[gun violence] is every day for us.

Among them was Shatony Rivers, who appeared on the Van Jones show on Saturday. And now we’ve got her words right here at The New Tropic. Read on.

Snaps from the "March for Our Lives" rally on Miami Beach Photos courtesy of John David Arroyo

WHO DOES “NEVER AGAIN” APPLY TO?

This weekend, tens of thousands of you turned out to “March for our Lives” demonstrations in Miami Beach, Westchester, Doral, and Parkland. Politicians, activists, and students called out for change and shouted, “never again!.”

But who is included when we say that? Liberty City teenager Shatony Rivers doesn’t feel like it includes her or her neighborhood friends.

Gun violence happens every day in her neighborhood, and there are no marches, no hashtags, and no meetings with politicians.

“For us, there is silence,” she writes.

“Why is it when there are shootings in urban neighborhoods, there aren’t therapy dogs granted to those families? Why don’t those people have personal police escorts to wherever they need to go?

I’m not trying to take light away from the massacre that happened in Parkland. I’m trying to understand why the same energy isn’t put into place in urban, often black areas? Don’t government and city officials believe our trauma is equal?”

She has a question: What will it take for “never again” to include her and her neighbors?

GREEN LIGHT LIKE A RED CARPET

The South Dade TransitWay already transports riders between Homestead and Dadeland, but soon, the buses will also be able to bypass traffic. The “Smart Signals” that Miami-Dade Transit is installing along the TransitWay will roll out the red carpet for the buses. It gives them the green light so they don’t have to stop and wait for cross traffic. Find out more here.

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WHAT'S NEW IN THE 305

From the beginning. Through interviews with everyone from survivors to 911 operators, from bystanders to FIU’s president Mark Rosenberg, the Miami Herald has pieced together what happened in those moments just before the stunning, catastrophic collapse of the 950-ton pedestrian bridge on March 15 – the near-misses, the thoughts that ran through people’s minds as they saw the concrete crumble, how the survivors felt in the aftermath. It’s well worth a read as we wait to find out what actually happened that day.

About damn time. Every state has two statues honoring important figures in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall, and until recently, one of ours honored Confederate soldier Edmund Kirby Smith. But now he’ll be replaced with a statue of Mary McLeod Bethune, an African-American educator, civil rights activist, and former NAACP vice president. Get this: she’s the first African-American period to be included in the Statuary Hall. We can’t believe it’s taken this long, but we’re proud to see Florida leading the way. (Smithsonian)

These gy-roes are coming to town. If you’ve ever spent time in New York, you know the iconic street cart chain Halal Guys. Now, even if you’ve never been to New York, you’ll know them and their delicious gyros, because they’re opening two brick-and-mortar stores in the 305 – one in South Miami and one in Brickell. (Miami.com)

Out of time. Miami Beach has had more than 500 households on the city’s affordable housing waiting list since 2015, so it’s a particularly big problem that they just eliminated one of their affordable housing complexes. Why’d the city do that? Here’s a fun fact: When property owners receive grants for affordable housing, they only have to keep it affordable for a certain time period. The time ran out on this one, and rent is about to jump up anywhere from  $400 to $728. (Miami New Times)

RIP. A local giant passed away last week: Wayne Huizenga, the original owner of both the Marlins and the Panthers and the man who saved the Dolphins from “financial ruin” by buying them. Back in the 1990s, he owned all three teams at once, a first in the U.S. He was also a big-deal businessman, founding three Fortune 500 companies, and a cornerstone of the philanthropic community. In short, he’s the kinda guy who will be missed in the community he helped to build. Here’s his Miami Herald obituary. (Miami Herald)

Toning it down. The Wynwood Business Improvement District board just approved a bunch of zoning code changes, including looser parking requirements and allowing more rooftop use, after realizing that its emphasis on large-scale development was often leading to no development. They’re hoping for fewer vacant lots and more small-scale development like the Wynwood we once knew. What we’re hoping for: more rooftop bars like No. 3 Social and chill hangs like Concrete Beach Brewery. The changes still need city approval. (The Real Deal)

Filling in the gaps. Little known fact: 20 percent of the revenue from that half-penny transit tax passed in 2002 goes toward cities throughout Miami-Dade County to spend on their own transit needs, while the rest goes to the county. And as the SMART Plan drags on (and on and on), those cities are talking about ways to use the money to fill the gap. Most of them are eyeing starting or expanding free trolley systems. (Miami Today)

BULLETIN BOARD

  • Are you a young nonprofit shaking things up in Miami? United Way wants to give you a shot at $10,000 or $25,000 through their Inspire305 program. Find out more info here. Applications close April 13.
  • Social impact accelerator Radical Partners is looking for 10 outstanding locals who are making their neighborhoods stronger for their next Leadership Lab. Apply here, or recommend someone here. Applications close March 30.
  • Applications for the 2018-19 WIN Lab Accelerator are open! If you’re an early-stage female founders with some business traction and a scalable businesses, apply here. Applications close May 31. (But don’t sleep on it.)
  • If you’re a woman looking to up your tech skills, peep Wyncode’s Women in Tech scholarship, which will cover the costs of one of their coding, UX/UI design, or digital marketing courses. Apply here.
What’s this? It’s a new feature that will show up every Monday. What you’ll find here: things like calls for applications, workshops, and civic opportunities around Miami. If you’ve got a suggestion for what to include, hit us up at [email protected]

EVENTS

PARTNER EVENTS
AROUND TOWN

HANG ON. ONE MORE THING.

There’s at least one very simple thing you can do to help keep the “March for Our Lives” momentum going: VOTE.

If you haven’t registered yet, you’re in luck. Florida launched online voter registration last year, which means all you have to do is click on this link. If you’re not yet 18 years old but you will be before November, you can pre-register to vote, too.

Now, let’s make this a great week. 💪